The system was assembled in Alameda, California, in a shipyard in the San Francisco Bay Area.

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The Ocean Cleanup

Hard-walled pipe makes up the floating component of the cleanup array.

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The Ocean Cleanup

The Ocean Cleanup says the floating array is equipped with lanterns, radar reflectors, navigational signals, GPS, and anti-collision beacons.

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The Ocean Cleanup

Solar panels help provide power to these systems.

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The Ocean Cleanup

Below the floating part of the array, an impenetrable 10-foot skirt is supposed to help gather floating debris.

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The Ocean Cleanup

Earlier this year, the Ocean Cleanup built a 400-foot test array to see how it held up while being towed out into the water.

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The Ocean Cleanup

That trial unit was towed out to sea on May 18.

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The Ocean Cleanup

It survived the two-week tow test.

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The Ocean Cleanup

The full array is 2,000 feet long.

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The Ocean Cleanup

Designing the first full-size array cost about $23 million, though the team estimates that future arrays will cost under $6 million to make.

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The Ocean Cleanup

The first array will be towed 240 to 300 miles offshore, which should take about three days.

The ocean cleanup launch
Kevin Loria/Business Insider

The device right now is long and straight, so there's not too much drag on it in the water.

The ocean cleanup launch
Kevin Loria/Business Insider

But upon reaching the test site, it'll be assembled into its U-shape for an approximately two-week testing period.

The Ocean Cleanup launch
Kevin Loria/Business Insider

Slat says that there, the team wants to see whether the fully assembled system keeps its shape and structural integrity — and the team also wants to see how it moves in the water.

boyan slat the ocean cleanup
Kevin Loria/Business Insider

If all goes well, it'll be pulled another 1,000 nautical miles out to the Great Pacific Garbage Patch.

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The Ocean Cleanup

Once the array is out there, the team plans to have a ship scoop up collected plastic approximately every six weeks.

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The Ocean Cleanup

But since this is a first array, The Ocean Cleanup anticipates having to tweak and potentially redesign aspects of the cleanup arrays and the plastic-collection process.

180827_Stabilizers_Assembly_and_Fully_Launched_System 2 The Ocean Cleanup
The Ocean Cleanup

Once the system reaches the garbage patch, the team wants to see how efficient it is at capturing plastic.

the ocean cleanup launch
Kevin Loria/Business Insider

Once winter arrives, the team will be able to see whether it can stand up to massive waves and storms.

the ocean cleanup launch
Kevin Loria/Business Insider

The first array may be complete, but its test is just beginning.

the ocean cleanup launch
Kevin Loria/Business Insider