• Tesla has filed a lawsuit against Alameda County, California, where the company's Fremont factory is.
  • The factory has been closed since March 23, when Alameda County ordered it to shut down as part of social-distancing measures directed at curbing the spread of COVID-19.
  • In the lawsuit, Tesla alleges the shutdown ignores an earlier order from California's governor that permits businesses in "16 crucial infrastructure industries," including transportation, to continue work.
  • Tesla CEO Elon Musk has threatened to move the automaker's headquarters to Texas or Nevada as a result of the shutdown.
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Tesla has filed a lawsuit against Alameda County, California, where Tesla's Fremont factory is.

The factory has been closed since March 23, when Alameda County ordered it to shut down as part of social-distancing measures directed at curbing the spread of COVID-19.

In the lawsuit, Tesla alleges the shutdown ignores an earlier order from California Gov. Gavin Newsom that permits businesses in "16 crucial infrastructure industries," including transportation, to continue work. It alleges the decision is both unconstitutional and "inexplicable" and says there is "no rational basis" for the facility's closure.

The company is hoping for an injunction that would render the shutdown order invalid.

Tesla CEO Elon Musk has threatened to move the automaker's headquarters to Texas or Nevada as a result of the shutdown.

On Saturday, he tweeted: "Frankly, this is the final straw. Tesla will now move its HQ and future programs to Texas/Nevada immediately. If we even retain Fremont manufacturing activity at all, it will be dependen on how Tesla is treated in the future. Tesla is the last carmaker left in CA."

For its part, Alameda County said it has been engaged in what it calls a "collaborative, good-faith effort to develop and implement a safety plan that allows for reopening" of the Fremont factory.

California Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez added fuel to the flames on Saturday, tweeting "F--- Elon Musk" hours after Musk threatened to decamp for Texas or Nevada.

In a blog post, Tesla said it had handed over detailed information to county officials about how it might get employees back to work safely, to no avail.

The company wrote: "We will continue to put people back to work in a safe and responsible manner.

"However, the County's position left us no choice but to take legal action to ensure that Tesla and its employees can get back to work. We filed a lawsuit on May 9 asking the court to invalidate the County Orders, to the extent the County claims they prevent Tesla from resuming operations."

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